How do You Deep Clean a House

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In the wake of coronavirus (COVID-19), the question is; ” Is there ever a better time to consider a deep clean of your house?” Homes can go through a lot of wear and tear, especially after a busy winter. At least once a year, it’s a good idea to dive in and scrub those spaces that might be neglected during routine cleaning.

Before you begin

  1. Clear away the clutter.
  2. Plan out where to start and finish your deep clean
  3. Organise all cleaning products and materials
  4. When cleaning always start from top to bottom so any dust or grime that falls down will not fall onto a newly cleaned surface.


*Kitchen

Start by cleaning the ceiling. This part should be your first port of call when giving your kitchen a deep clean.  
Use an extended dust brush to remove cobwebs, and dirt from ceiling. Dust and wipe down light fixtures.

Cupboards and Surfaces

Clean the insides. First, remove all the contents of your cupboards and drawers. Use your disinfectant spray and a microfibre cloth to wipe inside. Scrub down outer surfaces. Fetch a step-ladder and wipe down the outside of your kitchen cupboards, any shelves, and the extractor fan, if you have one. Use an appropriate cleaner on your cupboard doors. For cabinet fronts, a bowl of warm, soapy water and a cloth is usually best, though solid wood doors may need a specialist cleaner. Shine up the handles. If your cupboard handles are looking particularly greasy, remove them and soak in a bowl before wiping. You may want to polish wooden and metal hand-pulls once dry to get them shining like new! Put your belongings back, and do a final sweep. Once everything is stowed away again, squirt surface cleaner on the worktops and kitchen tiles and wipe down with a cloth.

Kitchen Appliances

Pull all knobs from the cooktop area and oven—if applicable, as newer models come with push-button controls—and place in the sink to soak. Add any drip pans, too. Spray all-purpose cleaner on any spills and splatters on the appliance and let sit. Move all small appliances to a kitchen or dining room table. Wipe down the exterior of your refrigerator, then head inside, tossing out food past its use-by date and wiping shelves and bins as you go. Move on to the cooktop and oven, which should be easier to clean now thanks to the time you let the cleaning solution sit. Clean the outside and inside of your microwave, pulling the plate to soak in the sink if needed. Wipe down the smaller appliances and return them to their places in the kitchen.

Skirt Boards

Using the vacuum where you can is a great way of getting rid of a large build up of dust in a quick and easy way. The duster will allow you to clean different angles and focus on the hard to reach spots. For more intricate style skirting boards that are a lot more decorative and detailed you might also benefit from using a cotton bud or toothbrush to get into those small intricacies.

Cleaning Hardwood Floors

Sweep or vacuum, then mop. Since wood can warp if exposed to too much water, we recommend mixing one teaspoon of castile soap into a 150ml spray bottle of hot water, then adds 10 drops of tea tree oil. Lightly spritz the floor and wipe it with a microfiber mop.

Cleaning Tile Floors

Mop with warm water and an all-purpose cleaner. Avoid acidic ingredients like ammonia, which can discolor grout. Rinse and repeat with plain warm water.

*Bathroom

Start by cleaning the ceiling when giving your bathroom a deep clean. Use an extended dust brush to clean away cobwebs and 2-step-ladder with a microfiber cloth covered in a mix of water, white vinegar and baking soda to wipe away moist and any mould areas. Dust and wipe down light fixtures. If possible, do this with the window open.

Shower and Bath

Mix water and white vinegar for shower head and taps. Wash all shower curtains with some old towels and hang to dry. For glass shower doors, mix 1 part distilled white vinegar with 3 parts distilled water in a bowl and microwave for 60 seconds. Pour the solution into a spray bottle and spray onto glass, letting it sit for 3 to 5 minutes. Then, use a microfiber cloth to wipe dry from top to bottom. For grout, you can use a mix of half a cup of baking soda, quarter of a cup of hydrogen peroxide, 1 teaspoon dish soap. Put the mix onto the grout and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes. Scrub hard with a grout brush then rinse with warm water. For a bathtub, first pour hot water from a bucket all over the tub. Sprinkle baking soda on all surfaces. Add two tablespoons of dish soap into the tub then use a stiff brush or sponge to scrub the whole area.

Bathroom Sink

Pour baking soda with any fizzy drink down the drain and rinse with hot water. Wash the sink with warm water and white vinegar. Wipe it with a microfiber cloth. Use disinfecting wipes for the handles and faucets in order to prevent transfer of bacteria from other parts of the bathroom.

Toilet Seat

Coat the entire toilet bowl with a toilet cleaner — preferably one without bleach. Scrub the bowl hard with a toilet brush and let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes. While that is sitting, wash the outside of your toilet seat with warm water and white vinegar as well as the outer lid, and then the inner lid. Don’t forget to spray the flush handle. Then wipe everything down with clean microfiber cloths.

Bathroom Floors

Most bathrooms have tile floors, as they stand up best to water. To deep clean your tiles and grout, start by vacuuming on the hard-surface setting. Vacuuming proves more effective than sweeping, which can also cause dirt to scratch your tiles and to embed in grout. Then follow with a microfiber mop dipped in diluted tile and grout cleaner. Use the grout brush to tackle any stains in those areas.

Getting Rid of Bathroom Mold

Mix 1 cup of white vinegar, with 1 cup of borax, 3 tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide, 1 tablespoon of baking soda with 1 litre of warm water. As with any new cleaning product, test it in a small area first to ensure it does not cause damage. Apply in the moldy area and leave for 5 minutes. Dry it off with a microfibre cloth.

*Living Room

Dust down the living room ceiling and corners of walls in. Dust and clean the ceiling fans. Spot wash, remembering air vents, doorknobs, doors, and light switches.

Walls

Determine if the walls need to be washed in dirty spots. Dust and clean all pictures along the walls.

Curtains and Blinds

Take down draperies, curtains, and blinds to wash or have cleaned according to the manufacturer’s directions. Vacuum and clean window sills and corners. Wash the insides and outsides of the windows.

Furniture

Remove all cushions from the sofa. Take them outside and give them a good beating with a clean broom. Pull the furniture out from the wall. Using the vacuum upholstery attachment, vacuum the sofa and chairs. Be sure to get the back as well as the sides. Use the crevice attachment to get into any nooks and crannies, then run the vacuum on the floor where the chair/sofa sat before returning the furniture to its place. Clean the sofa and chair cushions and return them to place.

Skirt Boards

Using the vacuum where you can is a great way of getting rid of a large build up of dust in a quick and easy way. The duster will allow you to clean different angles and focus on the hard to reach spots. For more intricate style skirting boards that are a lot more decorative and detailed you might also benefit from using a cotton bud or toothbrush to get into those small intricacies.

Carpets and Rugs

Start vacuuming. You should always work methodically – left to right, back to front. Move furniture such as chairs and tables to vacuum underneath. As well as vacuuming over any small rugs, you’ll also need to lift these up and get underneath them, as dust will gather there.

Hard Floors

Depending on the floor surface, you may need to mop too. If so, use the appropriate floor cleaner and warm water in a bucket. As ever, start at the back end of the room and mop your way out of the room so you don’t have to cross mopped areas! Don’t forget to mop in a figure of 8 motion to ensure that no areas get missed.

*Bedrooms

Dust down the living room ceiling and corners of walls in. Dust and clean the ceiling fans. Spot wash, remembering air vents, doorknobs, doors, and light switches.

Walls

Determine if the walls need to be washed in dirty spots. Dust and clean all pictures along the walls.

Curtains and Blinds

Take down draperies, curtains, and blinds to wash or have cleaned according to the manufacturer’s directions. Vacuum and clean window sills and corners. Wash the insides and outsides of the windows.

Furniture

Remove all pillow cases, sheets, mattress cover and put it to wash. Remove pillows, mattress from the bed. Take them outside and give them a good beating with a clean broom. Pull the furniture out from the wall. Using the vacuum upholstery attachment, vacuum the bed and chairs. Be sure to get the back as well as the sides. Use the crevice attachment to get into any nooks and crannies, then run the vacuum on the floor where the bed and chair sat before returning the furniture to its place. Put clean pillows covers, mattress cover and sheets to the bed and return them to place.

Skirt Boards

Using the vacuum where you can is a great way of getting rid of a large build up of dust in a quick and easy way. The duster will allow you to clean different angles and focus on the hard to reach spots. For more intricate style skirting boards that are a lot more decorative and detailed you might also benefit from using a cotton bud or toothbrush to get into those small intricacies.

Carpets and Rugs

Start vacuuming. You should always work methodically – left to right, back to front. Move furniture such as chairs and tables to vacuum underneath. As well as vacuuming over any small rugs, you’ll also need to lift these up and get underneath them, as dust will gather there.

Hard Floors

Depending on the floor surface, you may need to mop too. If so, use the appropriate floor cleaner and warm water in a bucket. As ever, start at the back end of the room and mop your way out of the room so you don’t have to cross mopped areas! Don’t forget to mop in a figure of 8 motion to ensure that no areas get missed.

Extra Cleaning Tip

Here is an extra tip you will find very useful when cleaning your house; we cannot stress enough the importance of a cleaning brush when cleaning (almost any part of the house). A brush helps to loosen dirt more than we usually imagine.

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